Design Observer

About
Books
Job Board
Newsletters
Archive
Contact



Observatory

About
Resources
Submissions
Contact


Featured Writers

Michael Bierut
William Drenttel
John Foster
Jessica Helfand
Alexandra Lange
Mark Lamster
Paul Polak
Rick Poynor
John Thackara
Rob Walker


Departments

Advertisement
Audio
Books
Collections
Dear Bonnie
Dialogues
Essays
Events
Foster Column
From Our Archive
Gallery
Interviews
Miscellaneous
Opinions
Partner News
Photos
Poetry
Primary Sources
Projects
Report
Reviews
Slideshows
The Academy
Today Column
Unusual Suspects
Video


Topics

Advertising
Architecture
Art
Books
Branding
Business
Cities / Places
Community
Craft
Culture
Design History
Design Practice
Development
Disaster Relief
Ecology
Economy
Education
Energy
Environment
Fashion
Film / Video
Food/Agriculture
Geography
Global / Local
Graphic Design
Health / Safety
History
Housing
Ideas
Illustration
India
Industry
Info Design
Infrastructure
Interaction Design
Internet / Blogs
Journalism
Landscape
Literature
Magazines
Media
Museums
Music
Nature
Obituary
Other
Peace
Philanthropy
Photography
Planning
Poetry
Politics / Policy
Popular Culture
Poverty
Preservation
Product Design
Public / Private
Public Art
Religion
Reputations
Science
Shelter
Social Enterprise
Sports
Sustainability
Technology
Theory/Criticism
Transportation
TV / Radio
Typography
Urbanism
Water


Comments Posted 09.29.13 | PERMALINK | PRINT

John Foster

The Open Eye: The Home Collection of Ray Yoshida


THE OPEN EYE, a fascinating new series of five exhibitions opening October 13 at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, responds to and presents in its entirety the vast home collection of Chicago artist and teacher Ray Yoshida. Spanning folk art, manufactured goods, pop culture, fine art, and ethnographic art, THE OPEN EYE considers the idea of the artist’s visual vocabulary as well as the proposition that the more one observes, the more one is able to discover, interpret, and, by extension, create. Yoshida (1930 – 2009) taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for nearly four decades and had an indelible influence on generations of artists, including the Chicago Imagists. With his guidance, students learned to look beyond the confines of Western art, to explore source material that would propel their work into something unique to their experience.

Yoshida’s belief in leveling hierarchies, in the elevation of vernacular aesthetics, and in the commingling of fine art with the entirety of visual culture is manifest in the wide-ranging collection that filled his Chicago residence. Included in the more than 2,600 pieces Yoshida surrounded himself with — from tattoo sheets and whirligigs to thrift-store treasures and African masks — are works of art by Martin Ramirez, Karl Wirsum, Joseph Yoakum, and Roger Brown. RAY YOSHIDA’S MUSEUM OF EXTRAORDINARY VALUES offers an unprecedented examination of Yoshida’s home tableaux in the greater context of his artistic oeuvre of paintings, drawings, and collages.

The exhibition closes March 2, 2014.

All images © John Michael Kohler Arts Center except where indicated.

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida in his Chicago residence.
Photo: c. 1974; Courtesy of Mary Baber.

The Open Eye
Interior View of Chicago residence, with Ray Yoshida seated.
Photo: c. 1974; Courtesy of Mary Baber.

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida in his Chicago residence.
Photo: c. 1974; Courtesy of Mary Baber.

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida in his Chicago residence.
Photo: c. 1974; Photo courtesy of William L. Bengston.

The Open Eye

Close shot of Ray Yoshida in his Chicago residence.
Photo: c. 1974; Courtesy of Mary Baber.

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida, Extraordinary Values, c. 1970; acrylic on canvas in hand painted frame; 36 x 36 in. Gift of the Raymond K. Yoshida Living Trust and Kohler Foundation, Inc. The Art Institute of Chicago.

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida, Eating Etiquette, 1982, Acrylic on Canvas, 35 3/4 x 49 3/4 in.
Acc. No : 2011.12.1, Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia. Gift of the Raymond K., Yoshida Living Trust and Kohler Foundation, Inc.

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida’s Chicago Apartment [Tableau 9]. Photo: 2010, Matt Austin. Courtesy of the Raymond K. Yoshida Living Trust

The Open Eye
Smoking Stand; From the collection of Ray Yoshida (1930-2009), Courtesy of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection

The Open Eye
Table Made from Sewing Spools; From the collection of Ray Yoshida (1930-2009), Courtesy of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection

The Open Eye
Bottlecap Figure; From the collection of Ray Yoshida (1930-2009),
Courtesy of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection

The Open Eye
Memory Jar; From the collection of Ray Yoshida (1930-2009),
Courtesy of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection

The Open Eye
Tramp Art Box; From the collection of Ray Yoshida (1930-2009),
Courtesy of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection

The Open Eye
One of 9 Felt Tip Drawings: From the collection of Ray Yoshida (1930-2009), Courtesy of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida, Untitled (brown speckled background).1990. Oil on canvas.
48 x 40 in. Gift of the Raymond K. Yoshida Living Trust and Kohler Foundation, Inc. Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. Photo: Paul Kodama

The Open Eye
Ray Yoshida, Untitled (home-tableau) (site detail: 1944 N. Word St., Chicago, IL), c. 1958 – 2003; mixed media; dimensions variable.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

The Open Eye
(from Alter Egos)
TOP L: Unknown, Untitled, n.d.; paint and wood;
7 x 5 1/4 x 3 1/4 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

TOP R : Unknown, Untitled, n.d.; hair, paint, wood, mixed media;
19 x 9 x 4 3/4 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

LOWER L: Unknown, Untitled, c. 1960; wood and paint;
10 x 7 1/4 x 5 3/4 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

LOWER R: Unknown, Untitled, c. 1900; horns, paint, wood, mixed media;
9 1/4 x 12 x 6 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

CENTER: Unknown, Untitled, c. 1955–1965; foil, horns, paint, wood, mixed media; 18 x 15 1/4 x 7 3/8 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

The Open Eye
(from Unfolding Landscapes)
Joseph Yoakum, Royal Gorage Utah, 1964; chalk, crayon, and ink on paper;
12 x 19 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

The Open Eye
Joseph Yoakum, Sunset Ridge Near Tallalina Okla., c. 1898 – 1972; ballpoint pen, watercolor on paper; 9 x 12 in.
John Michael Kohler Arts Center Collection.

The Open Eye
(from AAIEE!)
Jesse Jacobs, Untitled, 2012; ink and marker on paper; 15 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. Courtesy of the artist.

The Open Eye
Chris Ware, Actual Size from Building Stories, (published 2012),
2008; blue pencil, ink, and gouache on paper; 40 x 30 in.
Courtesy of the artist.
|
Share This Story

Comments

Design Observer encourages comments to be short and to the point; as a general rule, they should not run longer than the original post. Comments should show a courteous regard for the presence of other voices in the discussion. We reserve the right to edit or delete comments that do not adhere to this standard.
Read Complete Comments Policy >>


Name             

Email address 




Please type the text shown in the graphic.


|
Share This Story



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Foster and his wife, Teenuh, have been longtime collectors of self-taught art and vernacular photography. Their collection of anonymous, found snapshots has toured the country for five years and has been featured in Harper’s, Newsweek Online and others.
More Bio >>

DESIGN OBSERVER JOBS









RELATED POSTS


The Conceptual Advertising of J.G. Ballard
J.G. Ballard’s conceptual ads anticipated the emergence of culture jamming, subvertising, design fiction and speculative design.

How to Visualize Poetry — And How Not to
Design Observer's poetry editor, Adam Plunkett, gives us a primer on visual poetry.

Found, Cut, and Rearranged: The Art of John Stezaker
For almost four decades, the artist John Stezaker has steadfastly been appropriating “found” press photographs, film stills, imagery from books, old postcards, and the like, to create a strikingly new way of seeing photography.

An Aposiopesis of Black Honey: or Variations on Dürer's Melancholia I
A visual poem from Jess.

The Essence of a Teapot
While the traditional teapot should be at the very least functional — that is, have the ability to hold and pour a liquid, I recently viewed an exhibition that turns all that on end with the “idea of a teapot.”