Design Observer

About
Books
Job Board
Newsletters
Archive
Contact



Observatory

About
Resources
Submissions
Contact


Featured Writers

Michael Bierut
William Drenttel
John Foster
Jessica Helfand
Alexandra Lange
Mark Lamster
Paul Polak
Rick Poynor
John Thackara
Rob Walker


Departments

Advertisement
Audio
Books
Collections
Dear Bonnie
Dialogues
Essays
Events
Foster Column
From Our Archive
Gallery
Interviews
Miscellaneous
Opinions
Partner News
Photos
Poetry
Primary Sources
Projects
Report
Reviews
Slideshows
The Academy
Today Column
Unusual Suspects
Video


Topics

Advertising
Architecture
Art
Books
Branding
Business
Cities / Places
Community
Craft
Culture
Design History
Design Practice
Development
Disaster Relief
Ecology
Economy
Education
Energy
Environment
Fashion
Film / Video
Food/Agriculture
Geography
Global / Local
Graphic Design
Health / Safety
History
Housing
Ideas
Illustration
India
Industry
Info Design
Infrastructure
Interaction Design
Internet / Blogs
Journalism
Landscape
Literature
Magazines
Media
Museums
Music
Nature
Obituary
Other
Peace
Philanthropy
Photography
Planning
Poetry
Politics / Policy
Popular Culture
Poverty
Preservation
Product Design
Public / Private
Public Art
Religion
Reputations
Science
Shelter
Social Enterprise
Sports
Sustainability
Technology
Theory/Criticism
Transportation
TV / Radio
Typography
Urbanism
Water


Comments (11) Posted 08.11.07 | PERMALINK | PRINT

William Drenttel

The Presidential Rash



Lyme Disease. No caption necessary.

[Warning: Another occasional post on Design Observer that involves and invokes political content and satire. Do not read if you do not like your design commentary mixed with politics.]

It was reported this week by the Huffington Post that President George W. Bush has had Lyme Disease since last August — when he got the "characteristic bullseye rash" on his left shin. While millions of Americans have become infected with Lyme Disease, the White House nevertheless decided to keep this information secret for over a year, burying the news in the "past medical history" section of his 2007 physical examination report. (The New York Times reports on his annual check up here without exploring the one-year lapse in public disclosure by the White House.)

So what does a Presidential rash look like, anyway?


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
A standard Texas bullseye rash might recognize the importance of cattle in Bush's home state.


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
Lest we forget the Energy Task Force conspiracy of 2001, there is some question as to whether Vice-President Dick Cheney threw away 20 years of environmental caution to support the nuclear power industry in the U.S., 60% of which is built by Westinghouse. Could donations to the Republican Party have lead to a "characteristic Westinghouse rash?"


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
Who can forget when the Vice President shot his close friend, 78-year-old Harry Whittington? If only Dick had used his scope!


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
This is totally unfair because Target does so much to support design culture in America. Then again, their executives do give about 80% of their funds to Republicans. Maybe George wakes up with a Target logo on his shin as a thank you.


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
Last August, George kept saying NO. NO withdrawal from Iraq. NO to Nancy Pelosi. NO to Patrick Fitzgerald. He had to say NO a couple of times to Dick, just to remind him who was in charge. He even said NO to Laura on the evening of August 13, 2006. So who would be surprised that he woke up with the International NO Symbol branded on his leg?


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
Geroge knew that something was wrong when he saw this symbol pop up in a rash on his leg, but for the life of him, he couldn't figure out what it meant. He asked the Vice-President at their morning breakfast, but Dick just stomped back to his office, leaving the President to eat alone. (George, now confused, emails his trusted Fredo for clarification. A protest rally in front of the White House is broken up minutes later.)


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
D'oh!


Presidential Lyme Disease, left shin, 2006. (Reluctantly released by the White House, 2007.)
Feeling particularly exuberant and feisty, George takes a shower and discovers the Presidential Seal on his leg. God, he thinks, it's good to wake up in America.
|
Share This Story

Comments (11)   |   JUMP TO MOST RECENT COMMENT >>

amazing!
audrey
08.12.07 at 09:51

Not to take away form the lighthearted political nature of the article, but I'd have to say that Cheney's support of nuclear power is both a positive and negative for enviornmentalists. Whiel there is undoubtedly a lot of scrutiny on nuclear powers possible catastrophe's toward the earth, a few more recent thinkers have said that nuclear power—done safely and collaborativly with environmentalist—may in fact be our best option at weaning our world off of oil.

Stewart Brand (porbably the most outspoken on the topic):
http://neinuclearnotes.blogspot.com/2006/08/stewart-brand-at-nea-2006.html

But perhaps the Westinghouse logo means that PR has GW's ear (or eye) during outbreaks.
Derrick Schultz
08.13.07 at 03:18

Can we keep the radioactive wastes at your house?
Mark Barnette
08.13.07 at 09:27

This is not even remotely clever.
Jimmy James
08.13.07 at 10:36

One might successfully argue that Dubya isn't either.

(At least the article is captioned for the humour-impaired....)
L.M. Cunningham
08.13.07 at 11:52

Y'know - If you squint and rub your eyes while playing 'Hail To The Chief' backwards, the centre of that rash looks just like Satan (as drawn by Jules Fifer.) ;o)
russellm
08.13.07 at 11:58

Even by Drenttel's usual political standards, this was pretty lame. Slow post day at the Observer?
John
08.14.07 at 10:02

Funny. Extra funny!

VR/
Joe Moran
08.14.07 at 11:22

Can we keep the radioactive wastes at your house?

Mark, if you're willing to house all the Co2 emissions at your place, I think I could take one for the "team." ;)
Derrick Schultz
08.15.07 at 02:06

Seen the episode of Penn & Teller's bullshit about nuclear power Derrick? Its pretty good.
md
08.15.07 at 05:18

Oh hey, it's not *that* not funny.
lisa seaman
08.20.07 at 02:09


Design Observer encourages comments to be short and to the point; as a general rule, they should not run longer than the original post. Comments should show a courteous regard for the presence of other voices in the discussion. We reserve the right to edit or delete comments that do not adhere to this standard.
Read Complete Comments Policy >>


Name             

Email address 




Please type the text shown in the graphic.


|
Share This Story



ABOUT THE AUTHOR

William Drenttel is a designer and publisher, and editorial director of Design Observer. He is a partner at Winterhouse, a design consultancy focused on social change, online media and educational institutions, and a senior faculty fellow at the Yale School of Management.
More Bio >>

DESIGN OBSERVER JOBS









BOOKS BY William Drenttel

Looking Closer 5
Allworth Press, 2006

Looking Closer 4
Allworth Press, 2002

Looking Closer 2
Allworth Press, 1997

Looking Closer 1
Allworth Press, 1994

More books by contributors >>

RELATED POSTS


Mr. Vignelli's Map
Vignelli Celebration: Massimo Vignelli's 1972 New York City subway map is a beautiful example of information design that was ultimately rejected by its users.

Reflections on The Ephemeral World, Part One: Ink
An elegy to the makeready — those sheets of paper, re-fed into a press to get the ink balances up to speed, leaving a series of often random, palimpsest-like, multiple impressions on a single surface — in the digital age.

Cranbrook Commencement Address
"I come to you, like all commencement speakers, as an emissary from the future." The commencement address delivered by Julie Lasky at the Cranbrook Academy of Art on May 9, 2008.

Greening the Grocery Store
It turns out that the "recycling symbol" at the bottom of my yogurt container had nothing to do with its recyclability. So why was it there? My curiosity led to findings around which I built a design class.

O.H.W. Hadank
Paul Rand held Hadank in the highest esteem because he practiced modernist formal principles even though he did not follow its dogma or style. And most important, as Rand said “Hadank was then and always an original. A profile of O.H.W. Hadank by Steven Heller...