Ian Baldwin's review of The Grid Book calls out the coffee-table book format and it's middlebrow achievements."/>

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Comments Posted 04.15.10 | PERMALINK | PRINT

Alexandra Lange

All in the Execution


From Ian Baldwin, review of The Grid Book (Christmas gift, as yet unread, on my bedside shelf), in Metropolis:

…we need more books to be what The Grid Book sets out to be: a scholarly, cross-disciplinary design history for the educated reader. There are too many coffee-table image tomes, exercises in academic esoterica, and middlebrow “The true story of how X changed the world” volumes, and not nearly enough smart reads.

Too true. But couldn’t one of these three types actually be a smart read? I am working on a book proposal of Type 3 now, after a failed attempt to write one of Type 1 last year (see all posts on Alexander Girard) and certainly hoping so.

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Alexandra Lange is an architecture and design critic, and author of Writing about Architecture: Mastering the Language of Buildings and Cities. (Princeton Architectural Press, 2012). Her work has appeared in The Architect's Newspaper, Architectural Record, Dwell, Metropolis, Print, New York Magazine and The New York Times.
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BOOKS BY Alexandra Lange

Writing About Architecture: Mastering the Language of Buildings and Cities
Princeton Architectural Press, 2012

Design Research
Chronicle Books, 2010

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