Design Observer

About
Books
Job Board
Newsletters
Archive
Contact



Observatory

About
Resources
Submissions
Contact


Featured Writers

Michael Bierut
William Drenttel
John Foster
Jessica Helfand
Alexandra Lange
Mark Lamster
Paul Polak
Rick Poynor
John Thackara
Rob Walker


Departments

Advertisement
Audio
Books
Collections
Dear Bonnie
Dialogues
Essays
Events
Foster Column
From Our Archive
Gallery
Interviews
Miscellaneous
Opinions
Partner News
Photos
Poetry
Primary Sources
Projects
Report
Reviews
Slideshows
The Academy
Today Column
Unusual Suspects
Video


Topics

Advertising
Architecture
Art
Books
Branding
Business
Cities / Places
Community
Craft
Culture
Design History
Design Practice
Development
Disaster Relief
Ecology
Economy
Education
Energy
Environment
Fashion
Film / Video
Food/Agriculture
Geography
Global / Local
Graphic Design
Health / Safety
History
Housing
Ideas
Illustration
India
Industry
Info Design
Infrastructure
Interaction Design
Internet / Blogs
Journalism
Landscape
Literature
Magazines
Media
Museums
Music
Nature
Obituary
Other
Peace
Philanthropy
Photography
Planning
Poetry
Politics / Policy
Popular Culture
Poverty
Preservation
Product Design
Public / Private
Public Art
Religion
Reputations
Science
Shelter
Social Enterprise
Sports
Sustainability
Technology
Theory/Criticism
Transportation
TV / Radio
Typography
Urbanism
Water



Louise Fili

Louise Fili's Collection of Italian Tins


Bambi d'Italia

Few things make me happier than my collection of Italian tins, which I have found in the far-flung reaches of Emilia-Romagna, Tuscany, Italian Ebay and Great Barrington, Massachusetts. I started finding them in Italian flea markets over thirty years ago. Some are ornate in an Art Nouveau (or Stile Liberty) manner, while others have an Art Deco aesthetic.



I gravitate towards the ones with decorative typography and particularly those with dimensional typefaces. The tins once contained everything from powder (for both face and gun) to tomato paste, chocolates, peppermints and biscotti (for bambini grandi e piccoli.) Now they fill up shelves in my studio, where they provide endless stimulation and inspiration.
Share This Story


RSS Subscribe to Comment Feed

Comments (3)   |   JUMP TO MOST RECENT >>

So lovely. Normally I would want to cut them up to use in my work, but these are too fabulous! Thanks for sharing images from your collection and for highlighting yet another wonderful thing about the internet--the ability to glimpse worlds one would otherwise know nothing about.
Christine Terrell
05.05.11 at 10:50

Squisito! I think some, like the biscotti, are still in use or re-issued. One of my faves is the paper paste Coccoina, which I'm sure you have in your collection. It is still in use today.
When I lived in Italy, I collected the tissue wrappers of blood oranges.
Ron Rifkin
05.05.11 at 01:11

Slow News Week?
Mark Kaufman
05.06.11 at 01:19



LOG IN TO POST A COMMENT
Don't have an account? Create an account. Forgot your password? Click here.

Email


Password




|
Share This Story



ABOUT THE SLIDESHOW

A slideshow of vintage Italian tins from Louise Fili's collection.
View Slideshow >>
Louise Fili designs specialty food packaging and restaurant identities, and is pazza for tins that speak Italian. Her most recent book, with Steven Heller, is Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design's Golden Age.
More >>

DESIGN OBSERVER JOBS









MORE BY Louise Fili

09.05.12: A Life in Letters
06.13.11: For the Love of Scripts
More by Louise Fili >>