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Jessica Helfand
Essays | Biography | Articles & Essays | Books | Contact

Archive: September 2006


Death 'N' Stuff


London gutter, 2005.

It is early winter, 1894, and a young woman, a servant to a prosperous New York family, finds herself in need of immediate medical attention. Poor and illiterate, she takes it upon herself to seek a remedy for her discomfort by scanning the shelves of her employers' pantry, where she spies a bottle whose label features a skull and crossbones. Unknowingly, she downs a swig or two, whereupon she collapses in agony and is rushed to the hospital. Miraculously, she survives, later telling the police that she selected this particular bottle because of the picture on the label — a picture of bones...

READ MORE | COMMENTS (25)

Annals of Small Town Life: The Logo Stops Here


New Haven Railroad caboose, Main Street, Falls Village, Connecticut.

A center of iron-making in the eighteenth century, Falls Village (est. 1738) is the third smallest town in Connecticut. Today, it is like any of a number of other small, rural communities across America, unfazed by progress and untethered to any visible signs of commerce. (The closest Starbucks is nearly an hour away.)

In this, our first in a series of stories on design and small town life, we travel to a part of New England known for its dairy farms, its bucolic vistas and pitch-perfect fall foliage...

READ MORE | COMMENTS (10)
Jessica Helfand, a founding editor of Design Observer, is an award-winning graphic designer and writer and a former contributing editor and columnist for Print, Communications Arts and Eye magazines. A member of the Alliance Graphique Internationale and a recent laureate of the Art Director's Hall of Fame, Helfand received her B.A. and her M.F.A. from Yale University where she has taught since 1994.


Recent Book



Scrapbooks: An American History
Jessica Helfand
Yale University Press, 2008
More Books >>


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